Ontario's Live Performing Arts Organizations Call for Fairness in Provincial Reopening Plan

The Canadian Live Music Association says "continued restrictions do not reflect regulatory fairness with other similar industries"
Ontario's Live Performing Arts Organizations Call for Fairness in Provincial Reopening Plan
As coronavirus case counts continue to drop and Ontario's provincial government maps out plans to reopen, the Canadian Live Music Association is calling for fairness those plans currently don't offer the province's live performing arts organizations.

In launching their #FairnessForArtsON campaign, the CLMA writes that Ontario's recently announced "Roadmap to Reopen" plan "unfairly limits artists, performers, and live performance workers from planning for the future, and from using their venues to safely rehearse, record, live stream and digitally capture content."

"These continued restrictions do not reflect regulatory fairness with other similar industries and threaten the survival of Ontario's cultural infrastructure," the organization continues, referencing the ability of commercial film and television production and related activities, sound recording, commercial and industrial photography, and software or video game developers to remain operational while venues remain shuttered.

The campaign makes the following three recommendations to Doug Ford's Progressive Conservatives:

1) Allow artists to rehearse as soon as the stay-at-home order is lifted so they can prepare for reopening

2) Allow artists and organizations to livestream and record in venues as soon as the stay-at-home order is lifted, since these are low-risk activities that serve the public at home

3) Outline clear percentage-based capacities indoors and distanced–based capacities outdoors for all steps of the plan to help organizations work on reopening


The CLMA has also included a template email tool through which people can contact the premier, ministers, MPPs, municipal leaders and representatives with regards to the campaign.

Province-wide restrictions implemented in April ruled that even without an audience in attendance, recorded and livestreamed performances were unable to be hosted or broadcast by local venues for a four-week period.