Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban [Blu-Ray] Alfonso Cuarón

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban [Blu-Ray] Alfonso Cuarón
In the opening of Prisoner of Azkaban ― the third instalment of the Harry Potter franchise ― the titular boy wizard is hiding under his bed sheets experimenting with his wand. It's a not so subtle euphemism from the director of the smutty coming-of-age drama Y Tu Mamá También. It's his way of saying that Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Hermione (Emma Watson) and Ron (Rupert Grint) are growing up and that the literal superficiality of the first two instalments is, in part, something of the past. This time out, the kids learn a little something about necessary assimilation and repression to survive, with Harry using magic as a mode of vengeance outside of Hogwart's, regardless of potential punishment. His emotional act is juxtaposed with examples of social injustice, such as the imprisonment and eventual escape of Sirius Black (Gary Oldman), who may or may not be out to get Potter. Stepping back to the theme of illogical, but necessary, repression, this third outing in J.K. Rowling's popular series introduces the Dementors, who are essentially soulless beings that force personal confrontations with one's fears and past, typically causing insanity. This is particularly problematic for Harry, who actually has personal demons, as opposed to his classmates, who have all led moderately sheltered lives. Along with more complex themes and a somewhat foreboding tone, Azkaban plays with non-linear, intricate plotting, with Hermione travelling through time for the duration of the film, often out of sorts and responding strangely, or pre-emptively, to a given situation. It's a shame that thoughtful filmmaking such as this didn't make its way back to the series until The Half-Blood Prince, when David Yates experimented with quiet reflection and a minimalist score. As far as this limited edition steel book collection Blu-Ray, there's nothing new for fans, aside from the fancy packaging and tin case. All of the supplements were included on the original DVD release, covering cast interviews, visual effects, the creatures, choir practice and the construction of the many sets. It's quite comprehensive, but nothing new for anyone that already owns a copy of the film. (Warner)